San Diego State University

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MA Curriculum

In addition to meeting the requirements for classified graduate standing and the basic requirements for the master’s degree as described in the Graduate Bulletin, the student must complete a graduate program of at least 36 units (44 units for the Concentration in Speech-language Pathology). A student must complete Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences 799A, Thesis for Plan A. The thesis option requires approval by the school and may not be appropriate for every student. If Plan B is elected, the student must pass a written comprehensive examination (which may be repeated only twice). No more than six units of coursework outside the school acceptable on graduate level may be applied to the master’s degree.

The school offers one concentration leading to the Master of Arts degree as described below.

Concentration in Speech-Language Pathology

This concentration has a clinical focus and may be used to satisfy the academic and clinical preparation for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA); for the Speech-Language Pathology Credential from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing; and for licensure from the State of California. Students are required to complete coursework in all of the following areas: articulation, fluency, voice and resonance, receptive and expressive language, hearing, swallowing, cognitive and social aspects of communication, and augmentative and alternative communication modalities.

Graduate Program. Students must complete a minimum of 45 academic units and a minimum of 19 clinical practicum units. The following academic courses are required: Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences 570, 600A, 600B, 606, 607, 608, 609A, 609B, 613, 614, 617, 675, and either 672 or 673. In addition, students must complete nine units from Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences 707, 750, 790, 793, 794, 795, 797, 798, 799A. At least three of the nine units must be selected from Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences 707, 750, 790, 793, 794. A minimum of 19 units in the following clinical practicum courses are required: Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences 525 (4 units); 521 and/or 618A and/or 619 (1-3 units); 618B (1-2 units); 626A, 626B, and/or 626C (3-5 units); 627 (3 units); 629 (2 units), 929 (1 unit); and 933 (4 units). For students lacking transcript credit in aural rehabilitation, Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences 546 (3 units) is also required. It is school policy that all students maintain a 3.0 grade point average in their program coursework.

Students electing to pursue the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology (ASHA), California licensure for Speech-Language Pathology, or the Speech-Language Pathology Credential for Language, Speech, and Hearing for California Schools should complete, in addition to the required courses listed above, additional clinic hours required by national and state organizations. It is school policy that all credential students maintain a 3.0 grade point average in all 600-level and above credential courses.

Course Descriptions

521 Speech-Language Screening of Children – Screening speech and language of children in various community facilities and settings.

525 Clinical Processes Clinical issues, policies, and methods in speech-language pathology.  Experience in writing lesson plans and clinical reports.  Clinical observation to partially fulfill requirements for certification.

546 Clinical Issues in Aural Rehabilitation – Theoretical, methodological, and technical issues related to the speech-language pathologist’s role in facilitating communication in individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing.

570 Dysphagia- Measurement techniques and research in dysphagia.  Assessment and treatment of dysphagia and swallowing problems in children and adults.

600A Research Methods in Communication Sciences and Disorders – Methods of investigation in communication sciences and disorders to include research design, basic statistics, principles of evidence-based practice, ethical conduct in research design, and work with human participants.

600B Advanced Research Methods in Communication Sciences and Disorders – Principles of evidence-based practice, single-subject design, statistics for single-subject design, statistics used in longitudinal research and scale development: regression and factor analysis.

606 Voice, Resonance, and Fluency Disorders – Normal voice, resonance, and fluency, symptoms and causes of voice, resonance, and fluency disorders and their assessment and management.

607 Phonology and Phonological Disorders – Characterization of phonological disorders, assessment frameworks, intervention strategies.  Theoretical frameworks of phonology as applied to and experimentally evaluated in speech-language pathology.  Methodology considered within context of clinical cases studies designed to facilitate critical thinking and problem-solving.

608 Acquired Neuromotor Speech Disorders – Theories and clinical methods of diagnosis and intervention pertaining to motor speech disorders (dysarthria and apraxia of speech) in adults.

609A Acquired Neurogenic Language and Cognitive Disorders I – Theories and clinical methods of diagnosis and intervention pertaining to language and communication disorders in adults with left or right hemisphere brain damage.

609B  Acquired Neurogenic Language and Cognitive Disorders II – Theories and clinical methods of diagnosis and intervention pertaining to cognitive and linguistic disorders in adolescents and adults with traumatic brain injury, dementing illness, or frontal lobe impairments.

613 Language Disorders:  Infancy Through Preschool – Major theories of language development with focus on early language development:  effect of theoretical perspective on approaches to assessment and intervention:  development and evaluation of assessment and intervention procedures and instruments.

614 Language Disorders:  School Age Through Adolescence – Normal and impaired language development in children five years through adolescence.  Assessment and intervention for language disorders across spoken and written modalities.

617 Diagnostic Methods in Speech-Language Pathology – Principles and procedures for culturally relevant assessment of communication disorders in children and adults.  Ethnographic interviewing:  formal, informal, and unbiased testing:  clinical reporting.  Practice with selected methods and tools.

672 Seminar in Communicative Disorders in Bilingual Adults – Linguistic and cognitive system in normal bilingual adults compared to monolingual peers and in bilingual adults with language disorders.  Assessment and intervention strategies in bilingual adults’ communicative and cognitive disorders.  Cross-cultural issues in selection of assessment and intervention procedures.

673 Seminar in Communicative Disorders in Bilingual Spanish-English Children – Normal and atypical Spanish language development applied to assessment and treatment of communication disorders in bilingual and monolingual Spanish children.  Alternative assessment and intervention methods.

675 Augmentative Communication – Alternative and augmentative approaches, strategies and technology for individuals with severe communication impairments.  Assessment and intervention.  Project required.

707 Seminar in Phonological Acquisition – Theoretical, empirical, methodological, and applied issues associated with phonological acquisition of first-language learners, children with speech disorders, and second-language learners.

750 Seminar in Language, Cognition, and the Brain: Sign Language Perspectives – Sign language and deafness research applied to theoretical models of language representation and processing, language acquisition, bilingualism, and the neural organization of language.

790 Seminar in Foundations of Language Science – Current issues, theory, and research concerning language representation, processing, and neurological organization in adults and children.

793 Seminar in Disorders of Language and Cognition/Children – Language impairment in children, including primary versus secondary language impairment, modular versus processing explanations, relationships between language and cognition, as well as disassociations of development across different populations.

794 Seminar in Language Disorders in Multilingual Populations – Language disorders in linguistically diverse populations.  Disorders of phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic aspects of target languages and their clinical implications.

795 Advanced Research Practicum – Participation in a specific research activity under faculty supervision.

797 Research – Research in speech-language pathology, deaf education, or audiology.

798 Special Study – Individual study.

799A Thesis or Project – Preparation of a project or thesis for the master’s degree.

618A Diagnostic Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology:  Pediatrics – Supervised clinical practice in diagnostic methods with pediatric clients.

618B Diagnostic Practicum in Speech-language Pathology:  Adults – Supervised clinical practice in diagnostic methods with adult clients.

619 Multidisciplinary Diagnostic Practicum in Speech-Language Pathology – Participation in multidisciplinary assessment of infants and toddlers.

626A Pediatric Speech-Language Pathology – Supervised intervention practica with children.

626B Neurogenic Speech-Language Intervention – Supervised intervention practica with adults with neurogenic communication disorders.

626C Voice/Fluency/Dysphagia Clinical Intervention – Supervised intervention practica with voice, fluency, and/or swallowing disorders.

627 Advanced Field Clinical practice in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology – Supervised practice with speech-language-hearing problems in off-campus settings.

629 Orientation to Advanced Field Clinical Practice in Speech-Language Pathology – Procedures for organizing and administering speech, language, and hearing programs to adults in the medical setting.

929 Orientation to Public School Practicum – Goals, materials, and procedures for organizing and administering speech, language, and hearing programs in the school.

933 Clinical practice in Public Schools – Clinical practice in elementary or secondary schools or community colleges in speech-language pathology.

Specialization in Bilingualism

Students who have an interest in working with bilingual clients are encouraged to apply to the concentration in speech-language pathology with a specialization in bilingualism. Students are required to pass a language proficiency test in a language other than English. To be a candidate for the specialization, a student must be admitted to the master’s degree program in speech-language pathology since the specialization is coordinated with these endeavors.

The following academic courses are required: Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences 570, 600A, 600B, 606, 607, 608, 609A, 609B, 613, 614, 617, 675, 794, and either 672 or 673. Students must also complete three units of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences 750, 795, or 798 with approval of the school adviser. An additional three units must be selected from Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences 707, 750, 790, 793, 795, 797, 798, 799A. A minimum of 19 units in the following clinical practicum courses are required: Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences 525 (4 units); 521 and/or 618A and/or 619 (1-3 units); 618B (1-2 units); 626A, 626B, and/or 626C (3-5 units); 627 (3 units), 629 (2 units), 929 (1 unit); and 933 (4 units). For students lacking transcript credit in aural rehabilitation, Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences 546 (3 units) is also required. It is school policy that all students maintain a 3.0 grade point average in their program coursework.

Bilingual Speech-Language Pathology Certificate

The Certificate in Bilingual Speech-Language Pathology is designed for students who plan to work with bilingual Spanish-English speakers with communicative disorders. Students are required to pass a language proficiency test in a language other than English. To be a candidate for the certificate, a student must be admitted to the master’s degree program in speech-language pathology since the certificate is coordinated with these endeavors. The certificate program requires completion of 13 units to include nine units of substantive coursework and four units of graduate clinical practicum with bilingual speakers with communicative disorders. Based on research and clinical expertise of the faculty, as well as the availability of a clinical population, the certificate is currently focused on Spanish-English communicative disorders.

The following core courses are required: Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences 570, 600A, 600B, 606, 607, 608, 609A, 609B, 613, 614, 617, 672, 673, 675, 794. Students must also complete 6 units of 700 level electives and 100 hours of graduate clinical practicum with Spanish speakers.